NTP Server Setup: Time synchronization

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NTP Server Setup: Time synchronization

NTP Server Setup: Time synchronization

 
 

Network Time Protocol (NTP) is a networking protocol for clock synchronisation between computer systems over packet-switched, variable-latency data networks. In operation since before 1985, NTP is one of the oldest Internet protocols in use. NTP was originally designed by David L. Mills of the University of Delaware, who still develops and maintains it with a team of volunteers.
Time Servers and NTP serve are widely used to synchronize the time on computer networks. NTP provides the ability to access time servers, organize the time synchronization subnetNTP Time Servers and adjust the local clock in each participating subnet computer. Typically, NTP provides accuracies of between 1 and 50 milliseconds depending on the time source and network paths.

FreeBSD:

Network Time Protocol (NTP) by default comes inbox of the OS.
The configuration file locates in /etc/ntp.conf

CentOS:
Network Time Protocol (NTP) by default comes inbox of the OS.
The configuration file locates in /etc/ntp.conf

The configuration file is the same to Debian and Ubuntu, see below.

Debian, Ubuntu:
Network Time Protocol (NTP) by default doesn’t comes inbox of the OS. So we need to install it:

As far as you machine is to become server there is no need to left ntpdate, as it may run on the same port as ntpd and make mess.

After you ntpd has been installed configuration file must be edited. By default config locates in /etc/ntp.conf

Useful commands to check your NTP server:

shows status without dns resolv:

shows peers:

shows connected computers to your server:

NTP runs on UPD port 123; to check availability:
Debian, Ubuntu, CentOS:

FreeBSD: